What Is Your Brand’s Emotional Right Space?

Blog positive emotionsBrands must harness the power of emotions to develop relationships with people. This can be achieved by identifying the emotions you want your brand to evoke – the Emotional Right Space – and developing messaging that taps into those emotions.

Emotional Right Space Brand Examples — Let’s take a look at an impactful brand . . . Apple. This brand understands the power of emotions and uses them to develop long-term relationships with people.

Apple has identified its Emotional Right Space . . . the core emotions the brand wants every customer to feel across all touch points. The four emotions that Apple aims to tap into are: (1) Delight; (2) Surprise; (3) Connection; and (4) Love.

Disney identified one emotion in its Emotional Right Space . . . Happiness. Whether visiting their amusement parks; watching their movies and TV shows; shopping at their stores or staying in one of their hotels, Disney wants you to feel happiness!

Nike aims to tap into the emotions of (1) Confidence and (2) Inspiration. You can feel this in all of their communications.

Tip to Identify Your Brand’s Emotional Right Space — Which emotions do you want people to feel when they visit your website, see/hear your advertising, view your videos and interact on social media?

Here’s a tip . . . don’t identify more than four. When people feel more than four emotions, they’re overwhelmed and might tune you out.

Top 20 Positive Feelings and Emotions — To help you identify your brand’s Emotional Right Space, here is a list of the top 20 positive emotions (presented in no particular order). When people feel these emotions from your brand, they’ll share your brand’s messages.

 Happiness, Interest, Delight, Hope, Gratitude, Kindness, Surprise, Connection, Confidence, Admiration, Enthusiasm, Euphoria, Satisfaction, Pride, Contentment, Inspiration, Amusement, Enjoyment, Awe and Love.

4 Questions You Must Ask Yourself — After you’ve identified your brand’s Emotional Right Space, use it as a guide. Ask yourself these 4 questions. If you answer “sometimes” or “no,” to any of these questions, it’s time to readjust your marketing communications.

  • Do our communications across all media tap into those emotions?
  • Are my salespeople and customer service representative addressing these emotions?
  • Are we sharing stories in our content that evoke these emotions?
  • Is our social media presence sharing these emotions?

3 Ways To Engage Millennials With Experiences

Blog Experiences not things 7.2.15Why Your Brand Needs Millennials — Millennials now outnumber Baby Boomers! According to the latest Census estimates reported in June, there are now 83.1 million Millennials in the country, compared to 75.4 million Boomers. Millennials now represent $1.3 trillion in consumer spending and they’ll account for one-third of the U.S. population by 2020.

Based upon Millennials’ influence and spending power, your brand needs to engage them to be successful. But, you’ll have to kick traditional advertising to the curb because 84% indicate they don’t like or trust traditional advertising.  Your brand needs to be where they are, in-person and online, and show you understand their values.

Millennial Values — This generation has a unique set of values . . . Realness & transparency; creativity & self-expression; civic-mindedness, positivity & fun.  To develop relationships with Millennials, your brand needs to incorporate these values into all touchpoints . . . including experiences.

 Millennials Are Seeking Experiences — For Millennials, happiness isn’t as focused on possessions as it was for previous generations. Living a meaningful, happy life is about creating, sharing and capturing memories earned through experiences. Millennials highly value experiences and are increasingly spending more time and more money on them.

Nearly 8 in 10 Millennials indicate that some of their best memories are from an event or live experience they attended or participated in. Sixty-nine percent believe attending live events and experiences make them more connected to other people, the community and the world.

  1. In-store Experiences Engage — Stores are attempting to create in-store experiences that will engage Millennials . . . and, Sephora is one that’s doing it right.

Sephora knows that shopping for makeup can be a hassle. A woman has to browse the store for what she hopes will look good on her. When she thinks she’s found what she’s looking for, she’ll use the tester to try it on. If it doesn’t look as good as imagined, she moves onto other products. But, to try on the new product, she has to take off the makeup that’s already on. After each tester choice, she has to remove the product to try out the next, which is time consuming. And, let’s face it . . . frustrating.

To save time, she can just buy the makeup without trying it on. But if she isn’t satisfied with how the makeup looks, there’s nothing she can do . . . except throw it in the “rejected makeup drawer.” Admit it ladies, we all have one!

Sephora is addressing this unsatisfying shopping experience by using technology to engage Millennials. Last summer, they launched a mirror that simulates makeup on a shopper’s face by tracking her movements and “applying” eye shadow through the mirror’s camera. Customers can try out various colors by tapping the color on the screen to see how it looks on them from all angles by turning their faces.

Although the mirror can be used by all customers, it’s particularly appealing to Millennials because it helps them make purchase decisions using technology.

  1. Sharing Experiences On Social Media — Millennials not only enjoy experiences . . . they enjoying sharing them on social media! Tweeting and posting from events and in-store experiences is a natural behavior for this generation because they want to share with friends and family.

Taco Bell created an experience specifically to tap into this generation’s social media influence. For the launch of its breakfast menu, the brand gave prepaid burner phones to a group of 1,000 Millennials who received secret missions to accomplish via Instagram and Twitter. The chance to be one of the 1,000 and participate in something innovative and fun resulted in over 16,000 tweets about the campaign in just 10 days!

  1. Co-create Experiences with Millennials — They want to co-create experiences, products and services with brands. It’s important to involve them in experience and product development. But, Millennials want to be included in the decision-making process beyond focus groups or social media. The best way to accomplish this is to have conversations with them.

How To Create Experiences That Engage Millennials — Weave compelling experiences into your brand strategy. When creating experiences for Millennials, tap into their values of realness and transparency; creativity and self-expression; civic-mindedness and fun. When you do, this generation will be more likely to want a relationship with your brand.

Get together with your brand team, invite some Millennials and begin ideating how to create engaging experiences. Toss away the old way of thinking that experiences should be category-specific. Think about events that appeal to Millennials. That’s how you’ll engage them!

5 Steps To Engage Millennials — Brand Champs

Blog Millennials BC Feb blogAuthenticity, Not Interception – Engaging Millennials, a media-savvy generation comprising 27% of the U.S. population, requires an approach that marketers have traditionally not embraced . . . an approach about authenticity and transparency, not interception.

Millennials are always multi-tasking . . . many of them multi-task using multiple screens and multiple devices at the same time. This is a generation that grew up with the Internet. They’re used to checking online before buying something. And, they expect a seamless online experience regardless of the device they’re using.

Another consequence of growing up with the Internet is that Millennials prefer democratic, collaborative processes. They love being part of a team . . . they want to participate and they want their views to be heard.

Millennial Power – By 2020, Millennials will have $1.4 trillion in spending power in the U.S. They’re educated with an innate understanding of marketing and of their power over and value to brands. Millennials are significantly more likely than older generations to believe they have the capacity to help a brand succeed or fail.

Millennials As Brand Advocates – According to the Hashtag Nation “Marketing to the Selfie Generation” study, Millennials will advocate for brands they love . . .

  • 59% will “Like” the brand on Facebook
  • 57% will get involved in direct advocacy
  • 54% will purchase a that brand’s products in-store
  • 48% will buy that brand’s products online
  • Yet, 40% of Millennials complain brands don’t take them seriously. Don’t want to be “one of those brands?” Then, keep reading . . .

Brand Success – 5 Steps To Engage Millennials

  1. Make It Authentic – If your story is organic and not synthetic, it’ll engage Millennials. Johnson & Johnson’s Clean & Clear #Seetherealme effort, for example, is an unscripted integrated digital and social campaign that showcases real-life teenage girls struggling with their skin issues.  The 19-part YouTube series has done phenomenally well because it touches a chord with young Millennial females. The bonus? It made the girls feel involved . . . it gave them a voice.
  1. Support causes that are important to Millennials — Millennials are constantly on the lookout for brands that align with their values and allow them to actively make a difference in their everyday lives. TOMS is doing a great job with this type of marketing.  The TOMS “One for One” campaign is one of the most successful cause brand campaigns. TOMS is winning with Millennials by engaging them in innovative ways, encouraging them to share their stories and marketing a cause that’s different.

The TOMS “One for One” campaign is so successful with Millennials because TOMS provides an individualized toolkit for participation and Millennials are encouraged to share their stories and engage in open dialogues about the cause instead of the product. TOMS is now considered a movement by Millennials . . . not just a company.

  1. Create experiences — Millennials buy stuff for reasons that are different from GenX and Baby Boomers. They buy things they can tell others about. They buy things because of what those purchases say about them. This explains why Millennials spend money on experiences.  The traditional advertising route won’t work with Millennials. Brands that are engaging Millennials are shifting their marketing dollars to events where Millennials can experience the brand. Chipotle is engaging Millennials through offline and online events.

In 2011, Chipotle launched Cultivate — Food, Ideas & Music Festival. In the first year, more than 17,000 attended and attendance continues to grow. The Festival features live music and chefs from around the country. Attendees are also educated about responsible farming.

Chipotle’s content marketing takes on industrial farming with their video “Back to the Start, which depicts the life of a farmer as he slowly turns his family farm into an industrial animal factory before seeing the error of his ways and opting for a more sustainable future.

Chipotle’s offline and online experiences motivate Millennials to have a relationship with Chipotle . . . to eat at Chipotle, share Chipotle stories with their friends and collaborate in advocating for the importance of developing a sustainable food system.

  1. Provide opportunities for them to interact — Millennials have the need to share their lives online and in-person with friends, family and the general public.

Starbucks is doing a great job with this! Campaigns like Tweet-a-Coffee and the Starbucks app allow Millennials to use social media to share coffee and connect with each other. Starbucks locations encourage face-to-face interactions with their cozy seating arrangements and high-top tables that create a feeling of community. Starbucks Millennial marketing is successful . . . it ranks highly among Millennials in terms of brand equity, according to Goldman Sachs.

  1. Include them in decision-making — As Millennials age, it will be crucial for brands to continue conversations with them using insight communities and other engagement tools.

Millennials want to be included in the decision-making process beyond focus groups or social media. They want to be brought in as respected thought leaders to help contribute ideas and develop concepts and strategies. They want to get their voices heard in the early stages of a campaign or new product development.

Use These Steps To Engage Millennials — If you want to engage Millennials, your brand needs to make it authentic; support causes that are important to them; create experiences; provide opportunities for them to interact; and include them in decision-making. The result? Brand success.

Fran P4W copyFran Lytle is a behaviorist, brand strategist, author & co-founder of Brand Champs.  Fran develops brand strategy, emotional brand storytelling, content marketing & social media programs that engage people by applying psychology & human and gender-specific behavior.  She specializes in developing & implementing marketing-to-women programs. Contact her at fran@brandchamps.com connect with Fran on LinkedIn, Google+ and Twitter.

What You Can Learn From Shonda Rhimes About Branding

#TGIT

Since the 2014 TV season began, Thursday is referred to as #TGIT, (Thank Goodness It’s Thursday), because ABC has given the 8pm – 11pm time slots to 3 incredibly popular Shonda Rhimes shows.  Grey’s Anatomy, Scandal and How to Get Away with Murder are killing Thursday night ratings.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, these shows have given ABC its highest-rated Thursday night in 5 years.  Ignore the NYT’s article that declared Shonda to be an “angry black woman.” Ms. Rhimes is an extremely talented screenwriter, director and producer.  She knows how to engage viewers and she uses a human behavioral insight to do it…Motivational Drivers.

4 Motivational Drivers — People’s behaviors are pre-cognitively driven by 4 Motivational Drivers . . . “Belonging,” “Power,” “Freedom” and “Fun.”   We need to feel these in our lives or we’ll become depressed.  The #TGIT shows take us through these feelings from 8pm until 11pm each Thursday.  That’s why they’re so popular!  Let’s take a look . . .

Start #TGIT With . . .

TGIT#2For those of you who don’t know, (where the heck have you been?), Grey’s Anatomy is a medical drama.  ABC describes the storyline this way, “The doctors of Grey Sloan Memorial Hospital deal with life-or-death consequences on a daily basis.  It’s in one another that they find comfort, friendship and, at times, more than friendship.”

The show appeals primarily to the Motivational Driver of “Belonging.”  Secondarily, it appeals to our need for “Fun.”  Admit it, how many times have you danced it out with Meredith & Cristina? And, ahem, there are other types of fun going on in the lives of the doctors at Grey Sloan Memorial Hospital.  You know what I mean.

Next Up Is . . .

TGIT#3Break out the really good red wine!  It’s time to watch this political thriller that stars Kerry Washington as Olivia Pope.  Olivia dedicates her life to protecting and defending the public images of the nation’s elite by keeping those secrets under wraps.  She doesn’t just fix problems.  She fixes people.   Now, that’s one powerful gal!

You guessed it.  Scandal appeals primarily to the Motivational Driver of “Power.”  But those of us who watch, know there’s an underpinning of “Fun” in each episode.  It’s fun to figure out how she’s going to fix the situation.

Finish #TGIT With . . .

TGIT#4

This suspense-driven legal thriller stars Viola Davis as criminal law professor and defense attorney, Annalise Keating.  She’s brilliant, passionate, creative and charismatic. She’s also everything you don’t expect . . . sexy, glamorous, unpredictable and dangerous.

This drama appeals primarily to the Motivational Driver of “Freedom” because its storyline keeps us wondering if her students and her clients are guilty or innocent.   Our opinions change from episode to episode depending on Annalise’s actions in and out of the classroom and courtroom.

As in most of Shonda Rhimes shows, this one offers up a dose of “Fun.” We experience this as we try to figure out what’s going on and speculate on the outcome.

#TGIT Appeals To All Motivational Drivers — Wonder why viewers enjoy Thursday night’s 3 Shonda Rhimes TV shows?  By watching, they’re experiencing all 4 Motivational Drivers.

Motivational Drivers And Your Brand

TGIT#5

So, you’re probably wondering what this has to do with your brand.  Wait for it…by embracing this human behavioral insight, your brand will be able to develop strong relationships with people – for many seasons.

Here’s Your Branding Assignment — Gather your marketing team, order in some pizza and grab a large Post-it-Note pad.   Yes, carbs and the large pages that stick to the wall will make this easier.  Post 4 blank pages on your wall.  On the top of each, write 1 of the Motivational Drivers.  On each page, post how your brand taps into that specific Motivational Driver.  Keep posting until you run out of “hows.”

Be honest when posting . . .  this is not a creative writing assignment.  Most brands don’t appeal to each Motivational Driver equally.  When you’ve completed this exercise, step back and look at the wall.

Which page has the most posts?  This is the primary Motivational Driver that your brand taps into.  Which has the least?  Your brand doesn’t really appeal to this Motivational Driver.

Assignment Dos and Don’ts

TGIT#6Let’s say your company is an accounting firm.  This category typically doesn’t appeal to “Fun.” It’s OK . . . this is a category issue, not a brand issue.  However, you may feel compelled to post something here and might post something like this . . . “You’ll have fun when you collaborate with our accountants.”  Buzzer sound!  Really?

But, let’s say your accounting firm conducts fun outings for your clients . . . you take them into NYC around the holidays to see the Radio City Christmas Show.  Now, that’s fun . . . post it on the “Fun” page.

The point is, the more Motivational Drivers your brand appeals to, the more likely it will be to develop long-term relationships with people.  But, don’t force it!  Shonda accomplished this through 3 #TGIT shows.

Now What? — OK . . . now you’re going into analysis, strategy and execution mode – the equivalent of being a screenwriter, director and producer.

If your brand taps into more than 1 Motivational Driver, which page has the most posts, which 2nd and 3rd?  This will guide you in your communication hierarchy.  For instance, if “Belonging” has the most posts from this exercise, your web and social media content should lead with this Motivational Driver.

Take a look at all of your marketing communications.  Do you see, read, hear the Motivational Drivers that your brand appeals to – in the proper order?  If not, your marketing team needs to get to work.

Are there Motivational Drivers that have the least posts, but you’d like to appeal to them because it’ll provide a fruitful competitive space for your brand?  Then, brainstorm.  Think creatively!  What can your brand do to appeal to those Motivational Drivers?

The Motivational Drivers exercise will help you structure and order your brand’s content and imagery.  It also helps identify pre-cognitive behavior drivers that your brand isn’t tapping into.  This should lead to discussions regarding whether your brand should and, if so, how to make that happen.

Human Behavior & Your Brand — Your brand needs to motivate people’s behavior.  It’s a no-brainer that embracing human behavioral insights will help you succeed!  I’ve got to go . . . time to watch #TGIT.

Fran Photo 2014

Fran Lytle is a behaviorist, brand strategist, author & co-founder of Brand Champs.  Fran develops brand strategy, emotional brand storytelling, content marketing & social media programs that engage people by applying psychology & human and gender-specific behavior.  She specializes in developing & implementing marketing-to-women programs. Contact her at fran@brandchamps.com connect with Fran on LinkedIn, Google+ and Twitter.